Vegetarian, but bored with options? Check out the new ‘Engine 2 Cookbook’

Rip Esselsty pitches in to cook dinner at an Austin fire station in this file photo by Ricardo B. Brazziell AMERICAN-STATESMAN.

If you’ve ever shied away from a vegetarian diet because you worried that you’d be eating the same scoop of black beans and side of spinach every night, you should check out the latest from Rip Esselstyn.

“The Engine 2 Cookbook” (Grand Central Life and Style, $28), a companion to Esselstyn’s 2009 book, “The Engine 2 Diet,” includes creative dishes like chili made with tart cherries (!) and sweet potatoes, baked “tater tots” made with red potatoes enrobed with hummus (they look like armadillos), brats made with garbanzo beans, brown rice and oats, deep purple butter made with beets, and bright green muffins made with kale and blueberries.

RELATED: Want to eat better? Try “The Engine 2 Rescue Diet”

Esselstyn, a former firefighter and pro triathlete, teamed with his sister Jane Esselstyn, a nurse, researcher and recipe developer, on this latest project. The book, which is subtitled “More than 130 Lip-Smacking, Rib-Sticking, Body-Slimming Recipes to Live Plant-Strong,” hits store shelves on Dec. 26, just before New Year’s resolution season.

I tested “The Engine 2 Diet” for a month back when it first came out, then wrote about the experience. The book espouses an eating plan that focuses on plants, eliminates meat, fish, dairy and added oils, and limits sugar, salt and fat. For 28 days, I became a bean-, tofu- and vegetable-eating machine, and blood tests showed that my cholesterol dropped an impressive 40 milligrams.

I felt great, but struggled when it came to sticking to the program. I still eat plant strong and saute stuff in vegetable broth instead of oil, but some old habits have slipped back into my lifestyle. I eat meat a few times a week, and I love ice cream and cheese.

Esselstyn, self-proclaimed Head Lettuce of the Engine 2 program, swims on the same U.S. Masters Swimming team that I do, at Western Hills Athletic Club here in Austin. I  hold him responsible for getting me hooked on a 15-minute medicine ball tossing session to strengthen my core after every practice. He also taught me a pretty fun way to warm up my arms before swim practice.

RELATED: How to warm up for swimming? Do “the Egyptian” with Rip

The cookbook, I hope, will help me reboot. The food looks and sounds amazing, with healthy versions of things I love, like lasagna, burgers, scones, burritos and curry.

Esselstyn’s got more exciting news, too. He’s working on a documentary that he says debunks the widespread belief that animal protein is necessary for strength and performance. He joins James Cameron as executive proeducer of the film, which will debut in 2018 and feature interviews with world-class athletes and researchers.

For more information go here.

 

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